Callander and Oban Railway

Introduction

This line is partly open. The railway provides a service between Crianlarich and Oban. ScotRail provides a service on this line. The line ran between Callander and Glenoglehead Crossing (then called Killin station) until sufficient funds were found to extend it to Tyndrum. At Tyndrum there was a short continuation to lead mines. The next extension was to Dalmally. Finally enough money was raised to take the line on to Oban.

A branch took the company on to Ballachulish and other lines opened to Loch Tay and Comrie.

The line is signalled by RETB and controlled from Banavie, near Fort William. The line is notable for the Pass of Brander Stone Signals, an unusual set of semaphore signals which protect the line from rockfalls.

The line was a protege of the Caledonian Railway.

The remaining part of the line is supported by the Friends of the West Highland Lines who were formed in 1983 and have promoted the line ever since. The society publishes the excellent West Highland News Plus.

With the loss of the majority of the station buildings, the eastern half of the line and the Oban trainshed the line has lost much of its character. The scenery remains spectacular and Oban Pier retains its atmosphere as ferries, fishing boats, tour boats, bikes, cars, caravans and trucks for the Western Isles and foot passengers and tourists abound.

Much of the closed eastern half and the Ballachulish branch remain as footpaths.

Architecture

Of the open stations only Dalmally retains its station building, built in stone and with a glazed canopy. A signal box remains at Taynuilt. The distinctive timber station buildings of the line are gone.

Other highlights on the open line survive such as the Orchy Viaduct and the Pass of Brander Stone Signals.



Dates

  /  /1850Scottish Central Railway
New locomotive shed, Stirling Shed [CR], opened; stone built four road shed replacing timber shed. The shed was originally single ended with the tracks running to the north. The shed was used for freight locomotives and, later, the Callander and Oban Railway.
22/06/1864Callander and Oban Railway
First meeting of the Callander and Oban Railway Committee.
05/07/1865Callander and Oban Railway
Act receives Royal assent.
01/09/1865Callander and Oban Railway
Appointment of John Anderson as the company secretary.
27/06/1866Callander and Oban Railway
Contract for constructing the Callander to Glenoglehead section given to J McKay.
  /08/1868Callander and Oban Railway
With the line partly complete coal traffic begins. Coal begins to be worked by the contractor from Callander to Lochearnhead [1st].
  /  /1869Callander and Oban Railway
Terms of the working of the line by the Caledonian Railway agreed.
  /  /1870Callander and Oban Railway
Authorisation of Tyndrum to Oban abandoned.
01/06/1870Callander and Oban Railway
Callander Dreadnought to Killin [1st] (Glenoglehead) opened.
01/08/1873Callander and Oban Railway
Killin [1st] to Tyndrum [1st] opened.
  /  /1874Callander and Oban Railway
Tyndrum [CandO] to Oban, Oban Goods line and branch to Oban Harbour, authorised.
01/04/1877Callander and Oban Railway
Tyndrum [CandO] to Dalmally opened for goods traffic.
01/05/1877Callander and Oban Railway
Tyndrum [CandO] to Dalmally opened to passengers. A single road stone shed, Dalmally Shed, opened to the south of Dalmally station with a 48ft turntable.
  /  /1878Callander and Oban Railway
New approach to Oban Bay with a seawall and Oban Pier and Oban station authorised. The planned branch to Oban Harbour is abandoned.
  /  /1880Callander and Oban Railway
Dalmally Shed ceases to be a key shed when the line to Oban opens completely.
12/06/1880Callander and Oban Railway
Line opened from Dalmally to Oban for goods.
30/06/1880Callander and Oban Railway
Opening ceremony for whole Callander Dreadnought to Oban line. Banquet in Oban station.
01/07/1880Callander and Oban Railway
Line opened from Dalmally to Oban for passengers. The whole line is now open to passengers. Additionally Lochavullin Goods (Oban High Level Goods) opens.
20/06/1881Callander and Oban Railway
Steamers start running from Ach-na-Cloich up Loch Etive.
27/06/1882Callander and Oban Railway
Large fence built to detect boulders which roll onto the trackbed in the Pass of Brander authorised.
  /11/1882Glasgow and North Western Railway
Glasgow and North Western Railway proposed, the Bill presented to Parliament to seek approval.. The route was to have been a 167 mile long railway from Glasgow to Inverness via Fort William. Supported by the North British Railway and opposed by the Highland Railway, Caledonian Railway (part owners of the Callander and Oban Railway), Caledonian Canal, David MacBrayne and some landowners. The Bill was rejected in 1883. It was not built (a less ambitious variation of it, the West Highland Railway with an Act in 1889, did open).
01/04/1886Callander and Oban Railway
Killin [1st] station closed to public and becomes Glenoglehead crossing, having been replaced by Killin [2nd].
02/02/1889West Highland Railway
A blizzard covers Rannoch Moor and the party have to work their way through deep drifting to reach Tyndrum [CandO] station on the Callander and Oban Railway.
20/12/1894Callander and Oban Railway
Spur from Crianlarich station (West Highland Railway) to Crianlarich Junction [CandO] opened. New passing loop at Crianlarich Junction [CandO] allows removal of up platform and loop at Crianlarich [CandO] station.
07/08/1896Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Callander and Oban Railway (Ballachulish Extension) Act passed. (Alternative date 1/4/1896).
  /  /1897Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Authorisation of an extension further east to East Laroch, beside the Ballachulish Slate Quarries of East Laroch.
  /  /1897Callander and Oban Railway
Expansion of Oban and Oban Pier authorised in connection with the opening of the Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway). Alterations to sea wall authorised.
20/12/1897West Highland Railway
Connection to Callander and Oban Railway at Crianlarich, from Crianlarich Junction to Crianlarich Junction [CandO].
  /  /1900Callander and Oban Railway
Extension of time granted for expansion works at Oban.
  /  /1901Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Pier at Leitir Mhor authorised. (This was Kentallen Pier alongside Kentallen station.)
  /  /1901Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Callander and Oban Railway granted more time to complete line.
  /  /1901Callander and Oban Railway
Electric lighting at Oban authorised.
  /  /1902Callander and Oban Railway
Caledonian Railway authorised to take over and run the new exchange station on the Callander and Oban Railway, Balquhidder [2nd] (replacing Balquhidder [1st], formerly Lochearnhead [1st]).
  /  /1902Lochearnhead, St Fillans and Comrie Railway
Authorisation for diversion by at Lochearnhead [1st], by the Callander and Oban Railway, in connection with the opening of the Lochearnhead, St Fillans and Comrie Railway.
  /  /1902Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Extension of time for land purchase for the line and at Oban.
04/03/1903Callander and Oban Railway
Oban station enlargement authorised.
24/08/1903Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Line opened to passengers and goods. Stations opened at Benderloch, Creagan, Appin, Duror, Kentallen, Ballachulish Ferry, Ballachulish. For the opening Connel Ferry and Oban stations were rebuilt. Two large bridges were required Connel Ferry Bridge and Creagan Viaduct.
07/03/1904Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
North Connel halt opened.
01/07/1904Callander and Oban Railway
Lochearnhead [1st] renamed Balquhidder [1st].
01/05/1905Lochearnhead, St Fillans and Comrie Railway
Line extended from Lochearnhead [2nd] to the then new Balquhidder [2nd] station on the Callander and Oban Railway.
07/07/1905Callander and Oban Railway
Introduction of C. & O. Hotel Express.
  /  /1906Callander and Oban Railway
Water columns installed on the platforms at Balquhidder [2nd].
31/07/1907Callander and Oban Railway
Retirement of John Anderson.
  /07/1908Callander and Oban Railway
Falls of Cruachan Halt appears in timetable.
  /  /1909Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Charabanc service introduced between Connel Ferry and Benderloch over the Connel Ferry Bridge.
01/07/1909Callander and Oban Railway
Charabanc operates over Connel Ferry Bridge; Benderloch and North Connel to Connel Ferry.
02/06/1913Callander and Oban Railway
Motor service introduced between Loch Awe and Inverary.
  /  /1914Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Barcaldine Siding (a halt) opened.
  /  /1914Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Railway company and council finally come to an agreement to allow cars, on payment of a toll, to cross the Connel Ferry Bridge when trains are not running.
22/06/1914Callander and Oban Railway
Connel Ferry Bridge altered for road vehicles and pedestrians.
03/08/1914Callander and Oban Railway
Maid of Morven observation car introduced.
  /02/1915Callander and Oban Railway
Maid of Morven observation car withdrawn.
  /03/1919Callander and Oban Railway
Maid of Morven observation car re-introduced.
  /  /1920Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
West Laroch Siding, serving the West Laroch Quarry, closed and lifted.
01/01/1923Dundee and Newtyle Railway Arbroath and Forfar Railway Glasgow and Paisley Joint Railway Caledonian Railway Glasgow and South Western Railway Callander and Oban Railway Glasgow and Kilmarnock Joint Railway Highland Railway Cathcart District Railway Killin Railway Lanarkshire and Ayrshire Railway Portpatrick and Wigtownshire Joint Committee Brechin and Edzell District Railway Dornoch Light Railway Wick and Lybster Light Railway
Grouped into London, Midland and Scottish Railway.
  /  /1927Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Duror loop taken out. Creagan signal box closed, loop accessed via ground frames.
  /  /1930Callander and Oban Railway
Dalmally Shed closed.
  /  /1938Callander and Oban Railway
Dalmally Shed still standing, but demolished at some date afterwards.
12/05/1962Callander and Oban Railway
Caledonian Railway No 123 and North British Railway No 256 visit Oban.
07/06/1965Callander and Oban Railway
Closed to freight east of Crianlarich Lower. Freight traffic is re-routed via Crianlarich Upper.
14/06/1965Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Ballachulish (Glencoe) to Connel Ferry closed to freight.
27/09/1965Callander and Oban Railway
Landslide in Glen Ogle; line closed between Callander and Crianlarich. (Glen Ogle Rockfall).
28/09/1965Callander and Oban Railway
Due to the extent of the Glen Ogle Rockfall, Crianlarich Lower (excluded) to Callander closed to all traffic.
01/11/1965Callander and Oban Railway
Crianlarich Lower to Callander officially closed to passengers (the landslide closed the line on 28/09/65 and there was a replacement bus service until end). Following withdrawal of the bus service no public passenger service (bus or train) was available between Crianlarich and Killin [2nd].
26/03/1966Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Line closed completely between Connel Ferry and Ballachulish (Glencoe). (Alternative date 1/3/1966).
02/08/1981West Highland Railway Callander and Oban Railway
A Class 55 ^Deltic^ visits Oban for the first time (55021 ^Argyll and Sutherland Highlander^) on a ^Merrymaker^ excursion from Edinburgh Waverley to Oban.
23/08/1981West Highland Railway Callander and Oban Railway
Second visit of ^Deltic^ 55021 to Oban on a ^Merrymaker^ excursion from Edinburgh Waverley.
01/05/1985Callander and Oban Railway
Loch Awe re-opened to passengers.
23/01/1989Callander and Oban Railway
Sprinters introduced on line.

Route described

~1902 capacity increased.


Portions of line and locations

This line is divided into a number of portions.


Callander to Killin

Single track passenger and goods line from Callander and Oban Junction to Glenoglehead. This opened in 1870, coaches extending the journey west until the line was extended. Closed following the Glen Ogle Rockfall in 1965.

This was the junction between the Dunblane, Doune and Callander Railway and the Callander and Oban Railway which extended it to Oban. Callander [1st] was left on a short branch being replaced by Callander (Dreadnought) further west. The signal box was to the north of the junction.
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See also
Dunblane, Doune and Callander Railway


Looking east from Bracklin Road bridge along the course of the Callander & Oban railway on 21 July 2015. To the right, beyond the new house, was the ...
Bill Roberton 21/07/2015
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The original 1870 station here had two platforms, a loop and a timber building. It replaced the original Callander [1st] terminus in the east of the town. This station was on the northern edge of the town.
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The only train in Callander today; the barrel train beside the toilets at the rear of the Dreadnought Hotel. The car park on the site of the station ...
John Yellowlees 28/08/2017
A signal at Callander marking the start of the converted trackbed to Strathyre. It^s not an original! ...
John Yellowlees 28/08/2017
BR 4MT 2-6-4T 80125 westbound at Callander in the mid ^60s. ...
Aitken Scott //
5MT 44718 shunting Edinburgh portion at Callander to form Oban train. ...
David Murray-Smith 20/03/1961
4 of 32 images. more






A Glasgow-Oban train climbs through the Pass of Leny, north of Callander, in 1957 headed by Black 5 No. 44954. The location is now a popular footpath. ...
Frank Spaven Collection (Courtesy David Spaven) //1957
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This was a passing loop, added in 1893 due to the increase in traffic. Little remains to be seen of the loop, the line itself is now a dirt road, except a bridge over a stream which clearly carried two tracks. John Anderson^s proposal to open a public station here was rejected by the landowner.
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This postcard made its way to Argentina. An observation car (Maid of Morven perhaps?) can be seen on the rear of the Oban bound train, leaving the ...
Ewan Crawford Collection //
St Brides was one of a number of passing loops established along the Callander and Oban^s single track as the traffic increased. This one was between ...
Ewan Crawford //1988
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This platform was for the use of railway staff and their families. It was a single platform built in timber alongside Rock Cottage. The platform was on the west side of the line.
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Cast Iron fence post still in situ, which also has manufacturer^s name still readable. Picture was taken on a wee New Year^s Day walk on the Rob Roy ...
Gordon Steel 01/01/2017
The stump of one of the rockfall signals, like their more famous counterparts in the Pass of Brander, seen at the side of Loch Lubnaig, Northbound on ...
Gordon Steel 01/01/2017
CR 123 about to run into a snowstorm near Craig-na-Cailleach platform on the shores of Loch Lubnaig between Callander and Strathyre. The date is 12 ...
John Robin 12/04/1963
3 of 3 images.


Early in the history of the Callander and Oban Railway trains could halt at the north end of Loch Lubnaig for fishermen. There were probably no facilities and the location is uncertain. ...

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This single track girder viaduct was to the south Strathyre station, crossing the River Balvag a little north of Loch Lubnaig.
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This was a two platform station with a loop. It was originally a single platform station, possibly doubled not long after opening. The station was noted for the ornate stork fountain of Cruachan granite, the choice of the stationmaster as a reward for many years of service. After station closure this was moved to the garden of a house in the village.
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The north end of Strathyre Station seen in the mid ^60s from a northbound train, diesel haulage. The Munro Inn seen in the background remains ...
Aitken Scott //
The Strathyre station^s heron fountain - relocated to a private garden - was the choice of retirement present to a long serving stationmaster. It ...
Ewan Crawford 10/06/2013
Much of the former Strathyre station is covered by a housing development known as Old Station Court. This view is towards Callander from the ...
Mark Bartlett 26/03/2009
Nothing remains of Strathyre station but the Old Station Court road sign indicates where it was. This view is towards Balquhidder across the ...
Mark Bartlett 26/03/2009
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This was a request halt serving the nearby Kingshouse Hotel (just to the east) and road to Balquhidder Glen (to the west). The halt was built at the expense of the Kingshouse Hotel.
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This was a three platform station where the Callander and Oban Railway met the branch east to St Fillans and Comrie. It replaced Balquhidder [1st].
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See also
Lochearnhead, St Fillans and Comrie Railway
The imposing frontage and entrance to Balquhidder station alongside the A84 looking north on 14 May 2008, showing the gated entrance to the former ...
John Furnevel 14/05/2008
Stairway on the west side of Balquhidder station alongside the A84 looking south towards Callander in May 2008. The former passenger subway can be ...
John Furnevel 14/05/2008
A Black 5 stands at the head of a freight in the former Crieff branch platform at Balquhidder in 1961. ...
David Stewart 09/09/1961
The impressive stone frontage of Balquhidder station alongside the A84 in November 1999 - access to other platforms was via the underpass bottom ...
John Furnevel 01/11/1999
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The original station here had a single platform with a timber building on a curve and a goods yard. The yard was to the north of the station, on the east side of the line.
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This single track viaduct carried the Callander and Oban Railway over the Kendrum Burn west of Edinchip House.
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This ^B^ listed cast iron accommodation footbridge with a wooden deck crosses the trackbed of the former Callander and Oban Railway just north of Edinchip Viaduct [C and O] and west of Edinchip House.
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This accommodation bridge crosses the trackbed of the former Callander and Oban Railway west of Edinchip House. ...
Ewan Crawford //1997
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A landslide which had occurred in the very early hours of the morning in Glen Ogle was discovered on Monday the 27th of September 1965. The site was south of the Glen Ogle Viaduct on a section where rockfalls had occurred many times over the life of the railway. Trains that day were cancelled and redirected.
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The site of the rockfall in Glen Ogle which blocked the line, leading to a premature closure. The location has been somewhat sanitised since my older ...
Ewan Crawford 19/08/2017
The site of the rock fall in Glen Ogle looking down to Balquhidder. Not much sign of further rock falls. See image 28647. ...
Ewan Crawford 19/08/2017
This is the rockfall which closed the Callander and Oban as it was in 1993. What? You can^t see it? That^s it, that small pile in the distant right. ...
Ewan Crawford //1993
Scene of the landslip that prematurely closed the Callander-Crianlarich section of the Callander & Oban line on 27th September 1965, photographed a ...
Frank Spaven Collection (Courtesy David Spaven) /12/1966
4 of 4 images.


This is a disused 12 arch, 139 ft long overall, 44 ft high single track masonry viaduct in Glen Ogle running along the steep eastern hillside of Meall Reamhar and Scorrach Nuadh. It may just about have been possible for the line to have followed the hillside but would have involved very tight curves. The viaduct flies out from the hillside and then rejoins it. To the immediate south is a three ...

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A pocket camera view from the A85 of the 12 arch Glen Ogle Viaduct, and a further arched bridge over a burn a short distance beyond its south end, in ...
David Pesterfield 20/06/2011
A view looking south over Glen Ogle Viaduct in 1993, before restoration and conversion to a footpath. The rockfall site is in the distance. ...
Ewan Crawford //1993
The splendid twelve arch Glen Ogle Viaduct, as seen from the A85 on the opposite side of the glen, on a sunny 26th July 2018. Photo by Gayle Bartlett. ...
Mark Bartlett Collection 26/07/2018
Looking north from Glenoglehead Viaduct. ...
John Gray 30/03/2005
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This was the original terminus of the Callander and Oban Railway and located somewhat far away (3.5 miles by road) from its namesake the town of Killin which required a connecting stagecoach. Stagecoaches also continued the journey to other points west such as Tyndrum and Oban.
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Remains in the undergrowth alongside the trackbed at the north end of Glenoglehead Crossing in May 2008 include the base of the former down starter. ...
John Furnevel 14/05/2008
Close-up showing a derelict fogman^s hut standing alongside the Callander & Oban trackbed to the west of Glenoglehead see image 63944. ...
John Furnevel 14/05/2008
The well maintained former station house and a section of the up platform at Glenoglehead Crossing in September 2005. View north along the C&O ...
John Furnevel 12/09/2005
The lichen covered former railway bridge at Glenoglehead seen from the south east in May 2008. For the view in the opposite direction see image ...
John Furnevel 14/05/2008
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Killin to Tyndrum

Single track passenger and goods line from Glenoglehead to Tyndrum [1st]. This extension opened in 1873. Coaches extended the line west and even south, connecting with steamers. The eastern portion of this line closed in 1965 after the Glen Ogle Rockfall.

This was the original terminus of the Callander and Oban Railway and located somewhat far away (3.5 miles by road) from its namesake the town of Killin which required a connecting stagecoach. Stagecoaches also continued the journey to other points west such as Tyndrum and Oban.
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Remains in the undergrowth alongside the trackbed at the north end of Glenoglehead Crossing in May 2008 include the base of the former down starter. ...
John Furnevel 14/05/2008
Close-up showing a derelict fogman^s hut standing alongside the Callander & Oban trackbed to the west of Glenoglehead see image 63944. ...
John Furnevel 14/05/2008
The well maintained former station house and a section of the up platform at Glenoglehead Crossing in September 2005. View north along the C&O ...
John Furnevel 12/09/2005
The lichen covered former railway bridge at Glenoglehead seen from the south east in May 2008. For the view in the opposite direction see image ...
John Furnevel 14/05/2008
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This was a three platform station with two platforms and a loop on the mainline, the up platform being an island the outer face of which chiefly served the Killin Railway and had a loop. Trains from the main line could access the branch platform line and loop from either end.
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Killin Railway
Looking west about a mile short of Killin Junction on 14 May 2008, with logging activity taking place in the surrounding area and this site being used ...
John Furnevel 14/05/2008
Class 5MT 45358 on up train at Killin Junction in 1961. ...
David Murray-Smith 20/03/1961
Ambling down to the former Killin Junction station on the ^mainline^. The Killin Railway is below. ...
Ewan Crawford 19/08/2017
The overgrown island platform is all that remains of Killin Junction Station. ...
John Gray 23/07/2008
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This is a disused masonry single track three arch viaduct just west of the former Killin Junction station crossing the Ardchyle Burn. The burn is very much lower than the surrounding ground making this a viaduct which is about the same height as it is in length.
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Ardchyle Viaduct, just west of Killin Junction, seen from the south. This is a very high bridge, the Ardchyle Burn is some way below. ...
Ewan Crawford 20/04/2018
Ardchyle Viaduct, south side, crossing the Ardchyle Burn and showing the great height of the central span of the viaduct over the water course. ...
Ewan Crawford 20/04/2018
The remains of Killin Junction west distant signal. ...
John Gray 23/07/2008
It has seen better days but this fogmans hut still stands next to the remains of Killin Junction west distant signal in July 2008. ...
John Gray 23/07/2008
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This is an out of use single track three arch viaduct above Ledcharrie Farm which is to the north. The arches are reinforced with rails.
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Ledcharrie Viaduct seen from the north east. ...
Ewan Crawford 20/04/2018
Ledcharrie Viaduct seen from the south. If it appears to be on a slight slope that^s because it actually is. The ground rises to the right, the ...
Ewan Crawford 20/04/2018
View of the trackbed on the viaduct about halfway between Luib and Killin Junction. ...
John Gray 23/07/2008
A shot of the metal reinforcing rods attached to the viaduct which is marked as bridge No 130 half way between Luib and Killin Junction. ...
John Gray 23/07/2008
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This was a single girder bridge above Edravinoch Farm, which is to the north. The former bridge is east of the former Luib station and west of Ledcharrie Viaduct.
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Approaching the Half way point and a platelayers hut still stands 43 years after the line closed. It is built from railway sleepers and one wall is ...
John Gray 23/07/2008
A detour is required at this spot as the original bridge has been removed for scrap. Crossing the river via stepping stones was easy today but, in ...
John Gray 23/07/2008
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This was a two platform station. The main station building was on the eastbound platform, the building being of the typical style of the extension of the Callander and Oban Railway from Glenoglehead to Tyndrum [1st].
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Luib station became a caravan site after closure in 1965 and hardly any railway features remain apart from this cattle creep, which was situated just ...
Mark Bartlett 30/05/2008
Satelite dishes attached to a culvert at the remains of Luib station now known as the Glen Dochart Caravan Park. From here the Line climbed to Killin ...
John Gray 23/07/2008
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This was a two platform station. The station building on the down platform was a typical later Callander and Oban Railway timber building but with a canopy along the length of the building.
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The weighbridge at the road entrance to Crianlarich Lower in 1993. At the time the timber depot was closed and the track was being lifted. ...
Ewan Crawford //1993
37 405 arrives from Oban to take the timber train west to Oban. Note the base of a signalpost in the foreground. ...
Ewan Crawford //1990
Having passed under the West Highland 37 403 heads west to Crianlarich Lower Junction to run back to Glasgow light engine. ...
Ewan Crawford //1990
37 403 at Crianlarich Lower. This locomotive rejoiced in the name Glendarroch, an imaginary place in a television series. Line here now closed and ...
Ewan Crawford //1990
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This junction remains open - just. A short somewhat grassy siding runs east.
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West Highland Railway
At Lower Crianlarich Junction the former C&O remains as a grassy siding, at least not much worse than 10 years ago see image 9831. The name of the ...
Ewan Crawford 29/07/2016
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Crianlarich Junction [CandO] had an elaborate layout. The Callander and Oban Railway was doubled from west of the junction through the junction and further east, and the West Highland Railway was also double on approach to the junction.
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A Glasgow - Oban service between Crianlarich and Tyndrum. ...
Norman McNab //
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This single track four arch viaduct, crossing the River Cononish, is between Crianlarich and Tyndrum Lower on the 1873 extension of the line from Killin [1st] to Tyndrum [1st].
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A westbound Sprinter approaches Tyndrum Lower from the east. The train is about to cross the Cononish Viaduct. ...
Ewan Crawford 05/03/2020
An eastbound ex-Oban train, seen about to cross the Cononish Viaduct, in March 2020. ...
Ewan Crawford 05/03/2020
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[This location name is somewhat artificial.] In 1877 the railway was extended west to Dalmally via a replacement Tyndrum station (now called Tyndrum Lower) and the original Tyndrum [1st] station became a goods yard and its signal box [1st box] closed. A new box was provided for the goods and passenger station [2nd box].
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This view looks north over the location where the Callander and Oban line to Tyndrum was extended west to Dalmally and Oban. Beyond the line in the ...
Ewan Crawford 19/12/2014
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This was the terminus at Tyndrum of the extension of the Callander and Oban Railway west from Killin [1st].
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The site of the original terminus at Tyndrum in 1994, the nearer part is now the site of a pair of houses. The view looks east. From here a tramway ...
Ewan Crawford 26/12/1994
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Tyndrum to Dalmally

Single track passenger and goods line from Tyndrum Goods Ground Frame to Dalmally. This extension left the original Tyndrum station on a short branch, the original became a goods yard. The extension opened in 1877 and remains opened today.

[This location name is somewhat artificial.] In 1877 the railway was extended west to Dalmally via a replacement Tyndrum station (now called Tyndrum Lower) and the original Tyndrum [1st] station became a goods yard and its signal box [1st box] closed. A new box was provided for the goods and passenger station [2nd box].
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This view looks north over the location where the Callander and Oban line to Tyndrum was extended west to Dalmally and Oban. Beyond the line in the ...
Ewan Crawford 19/12/2014
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This is a single platform station. The platform is on the north side of the running line. There is a car park at the west end and an occupational crossing. The station is south of Tyndrum, a small settlement at the west end of Strath Fillan.
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An Oban service calls at Tyndrum Lower on 1st November 2017. It^s running late because of a delayed Up service and will in turn delay the next Up ...
David Panton 01/11/2017
44871 and 45407 top and tail The West Highlander coming out of the sun on 23 September on the gradient between Crianlarich and Tyndrum on the ...
John Gray 23/09/2014
The mid-morning Glasgow to Oban service pulls out of Tyndrum Lower. The conductor is assured that, despite form, I wasn^t going to get back on again. ...
David Panton 31/10/2018
Westbound at Tyndrum Lower. ...
Ewan Crawford //
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This was a passing loop opened in 1882 to increase capacity of the line. It broke the single track section between Tyndrum Lower and Dalmally.
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This is the stump of the up starter at Glenlochy Crossing seen in 1994. The view looks east. ...
Ewan Crawford //1994
This footbridge was the approach to the signal box and loop at Glenlochy Crossing (a former loop between Dalmally and Tyndrum). This was one of the ...
Ewan Crawford //1994
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This is a two platform station. The main station building is on the eastbound (up) platform and is a red stone built two storey house with single storey offices. Gables are crow-stepped. The building is fitted with a full length glass canopy over the platform. The very fine building is due to the use of the station by the Duke of Argyll. The original timber station building burned down in 1898. ...

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Scotrail 156457 departs Dalmally, with a Glasgow Queen Street to Oban early morning service, just before the rain resumed on 4th September 2019.
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Alastair McLellan 04/09/2019
156500 arrives at its Dalmally destination with the afternoon service from Oban on a very wet 3rd September 2019. This was well used as a school ...
Alastair McLellan 03/09/2019
Dalmally in 1985. Still with semaphores and something soon to arrive. The box was of a style used latterly on the line, another example being at ...
Bill Roberton 28/09/1985
The signal box at Dalmally station in April 2005, seen from the westbound platform. ...
John Furnevel 15/04/2005
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Remains of a buffer stop at the former long gone shed by Dalmally station. ...
Ewan Crawford 10/06/2013
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Dalmally to Oban

Single track passenger and goods line from Dalmally to Oban. This line opened in 1880 completing the main line of the Callander and Oban. Use of mass concrete was made and the line finished at a superb seaside station where connections to steamers could be made. A general goods yard was at a higher level in the town. The line remains open.

This is a two platform station. The main station building is on the eastbound (up) platform and is a red stone built two storey house with single storey offices. Gables are crow-stepped. The building is fitted with a full length glass canopy over the platform. The very fine building is due to the use of the station by the Duke of Argyll. The original timber station building burned down in 1898. ...

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Scotrail 156457 departs Dalmally, with a Glasgow Queen Street to Oban early morning service, just before the rain resumed on 4th September 2019.
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Alastair McLellan 04/09/2019
156500 arrives at its Dalmally destination with the afternoon service from Oban on a very wet 3rd September 2019. This was well used as a school ...
Alastair McLellan 03/09/2019
Dalmally in 1985. Still with semaphores and something soon to arrive. The box was of a style used latterly on the line, another example being at ...
Bill Roberton 28/09/1985
The signal box at Dalmally station in April 2005, seen from the westbound platform. ...
John Furnevel 15/04/2005
4 of 27 images. more


This is a seven single track span girder viaduct crossing the River Orchy. It is the longest viaduct on the Callander and Oban Railway route.
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Kilchurn Castle Loch Awe. Picture taken from the Afternoon Oban to Glasgow Queen Street sprinter. ...
Gordon Steel 11/10/2016
A 1992 view of a then new Sprinter crossing Orchy Viaduct eastbound. Kilchurn Castle can be seen, only just, at the west side under the viaduct deck. ...
Ewan Crawford //1992
This level crossing, just east of the Orchy Viaduct, was the route to Kilchurn Castle in 1992 (a second walking route under the viaduct was provided ...
Ewan Crawford //1992
Orchy Viaduct between Dalmally and Lochawe on the West Highland Line.
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Norman Bews //
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This was the junction for the Ben Cruachan Granite Quarries. The branch opened in 1885, five years after the main line. Trains from the branch ran on to Loch Awe to use the goods yard there as exchange sidings. The junction was released using the tablet for the Loch Awe to Dalmally section on which the junction lay. The junction closed in 1916.
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See also
Ben Cruachan Quarries Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)


This is a single platform station alongside the north east shore of Loch Awe [Loch] with a footbridge over the line giving access to a pier, Loch Awe Pier. Only the former eastbound platform remains in use. High above is the Loch Awe Hotel which may be reached by a staircase up a cliff.
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An Oban to Glasgow Queen St service approaching Loch Awe station, passing the camping coach, on 3rd September 2019. ...
Alastair McLellan 03/09/2019
156500, with a Dalmally to Oban, service departs Loch Awe on a miserable dreich evening, 3rd September 2019.
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Alastair McLellan 03/09/2019
A view of Loch Awe station from the footbridge on 3rd September 2019. This allows access from Loch Awe Hotel to the loch shore.
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Alastair McLellan 03/09/2019
ScotRail 156500 at Loch Awe station on 1 October 2014. ...
John Yellowlees 01/10/2014
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This is a small single platform near the Falls of Cruachan and Cruachan Hydro Electric Scheme visitor^s centre.
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A westbound Sprinter has just left Falls of Cruachan on 21st June 2019 and is heading west for Oban. Below and to the right is the Cruachan Power ...
Ewan Crawford 21/06/2019
1Y24, the 1243 Oban to Glasgow Queen St, approaching Falls of Cruachan station on 3rd September 2019. ...
Alastair McLellan 03/09/2019
A late running Glasgow to Oban Sprinter above Loch Awe on the approach to Falls of Cruachan on 21st June 2019. ...
Ewan Crawford 21/06/2019
A sprinter approaches one of the rockfall signals at Cruachan on Loch Awe on 21st June 2019. The road below is on a section of bridge. ...
Ewan Crawford 21/06/2019
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This is a single track three arch viaduct with castellated parapets. It crosses at the Falls of Cruachan where the Allt Cruachan drops into Loch Awe, just west of Falls of Cruachan station.
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This was a passing loop on the single track Callander and Oban Railway. The loop broke the section between Taynuilt, to the west, and Loch Awe to the east. Prior to the loop the single track length was 9.1 miles, broken into 4.5 miles to the west and 4.6 miles to the east).
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The site of Awe crossing is pretty much impossible to see. There^s not much to be seen from the roadside below. Perhaps more can be seen from the ...
Ewan Crawford 21/06/2019
A westbound sprinter seen from the southern cliff tops in the Pass of Brander on 21st June 2019. ...
Ewan Crawford 21/06/2019
View west over the Pass of Brander to Loch Etive beyond. A sprinter makes its way along the tree lined track on 21st June 2019. ...
Ewan Crawford 21/06/2019
An Oban-Glasgow train in the Pass of Brander above the west arm of Loch Awe. It has passed the site of Awe Crossing (roughly the left centre of the ...
Ewan Crawford 21/06/2019
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A series of 17 stone signals over a length of 3.2 miles are controlled by a rock screen uphill from the railway. The hillside above, the lower slope of Ben Cruachan, is sheer and rockfalls not uncommon. The portion of protected railway is on the north bank of Loch and includes Falls of Cruachan station and the former Awe Crossing.
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Crunachy Siding looking east, in 1991, with the west end of Loch Awe off to the right. This loading bank was located between Taynuilt and Awe ...
Ewan Crawford //1991
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This is a two platform station which retains its 1921 signal box. There is a small car park. The station has a passing loop and sidings. It opened on the 1880 extension of the Callander and Oban Railway from Dalmally to Oban.
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Taynuilt Signal Box in the snow. ...
John Yellowlees 12/01/2017
Taynuilt, looking east in 1985, while the box was still in operation. Distant signals were replaced with boards in 1985 and the remaining signals were ...
Bill Roberton //1985
Platform scene at Taynuilt in 1990. ...
Ewan Crawford //1990
The Callander & Oban Railway crest from Taynuilt on display in the CalMac terminal at Oban on 29 March. See image 12002 ...
John Yellowlees 29/03/2012
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This was a single platform station with a station building. The building was a smaller style C&O building. The platform was on the north side of the line.
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Eastbound 37 hauled train at Ach-na-cloich. Station building now demolished. ...
Ewan Crawford //1988
Ach-na-cloich. Sadly the old station building has gone. ...
Ewan Crawford //
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This is a single platform station with a shelter. There is a car park on the north side of the station. At the east end of the station is a goods loop and oil siding (both out of use). The station was once far larger and a junction.
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See also
Ballachulish Branch (Callander and Oban Railway)
Ex-CR Class 2P 0-4-4T 55124 at Connel Ferry on 1720 train for Ballachulish in 1960.
See query 2103 ...
David Murray-Smith 20/03/1960
55260 with the Ballachulish branch train at Connel Ferry in September 1961. ...
David Stewart 09/09/1961
The first train of the day for Oban, formed by Corkerhill Sprinter 156467, pulls in to a deserted Connel Ferry station, where the track has recently ...
Mark Bartlett 27/03/2009
Overview of Connel Ferry station from the east showing the out of use oil siding at the east end of the station. The oil depot remains in use. ...
Ewan Crawford 10/06/2013
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This was an extensive set of Wartime sidings laid out at Connel Ferry station in 1940 for the Admiralty. The sidings ran south east from the west end of the station, making a trailing connection by the west box.
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This crossing was opened to break the single track section between Oban and Connel Ferry at Glencruitten Summit.
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Glencruitten Crossing looking to Oban in 2001 with its unique style of building to the right of the track combining signal box and accommodation. It ...
Ewan Crawford 04/01/2001
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Oban Goods Junction was south of Oban station and provided access to Oban^s principal goods yard, Lochavullin Goods, and locomotive shed Oban Shed. Both opened with the Oban extension in 1880.
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37401 reversing an oil train into the siding from Oban Goods ground frame in the 1990s. The siding was ^taken out of use^ in 2011 after a period of ...
Ewan Crawford Collection //
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This shed was south of Oban station and access from the junction for the Lochavuillin Goods at Oban Goods Junction. Access to the goods yard was from the south and a reversal was necessary to reach the shed.
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A closed goods yard south of the passenger terminus in Oban. The location is also known as Oban Goods or Oban High Level Goods. There were a number of sidings here and the Oban Shed, of which the turntable pit remains. An oil siding remained in use here until the early 1990s. ...

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Oil tanks in the high level goods siding above Oban Bay looking south in 1990. Originally the Lochavullin goods yard was off to the left, this siding ...
Ewan Crawford //1990
The site of Lochavullin Goods and the old Oban cattle market viewed from the south. See image 53163. ...
Ewan Crawford 10/06/2013
View over the oil depot at Oban Goods on 5 July 1991. This siding was near the location of the turntable at Oban shed. ...
Bill Roberton 05/07/1991
The high level goods yard above Oban in a view looking north east. The approach to the pier can^t be seen - it is in a cutting beyond the cottage seen ...
Ewan Crawford Collection //
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This is a terminus at a ferry pier on Oban Bay. Oban is a major port for the islands with Caledonian MacBrayne operating services to Mull, Lismore and beyond.
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37191 at Oban with a train to Glasgow Queen Street in 1985. ...
Bill Roberton //1985
First ScotRail 156450 stands in the sunshine at Oban shortly after noon on 28 April 2015. The DMU had arrived earlier as the 0820 from Glasgow Queen ...
John Furnevel 28/04/2015
Sign at Oban station car park, July 2009. ...
Graham Morgan 06/07/2009
Super sprinter 156474 awaits at Oban with the 14.41 service to Glasgow Queen Street in October 2016. ...
Gordon Steel 11/10/2016
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