Coltness Iron Works



Dates

  /  /1829Wishaw and Coltness Railway
Act receives Royal assent. Line gauge was 4ft6in and was extended slowly south from Whifflet and Carnbroe Iron Works to the Coltness Iron Works Railway and the Chapel Colliery. A branch was authorised to Newarthill to meet the Omoa Iron Works Railway.
  /  /1837Wishaw and Coltness Railway
A further extension of time allowed to complete works. Line authorised to use locomotives through the Jerviston Estate - the company and Houldsworths of the Coltness Iron Works buying the rights.
  /05/1839Coltness Iron Works
Opened by the Houldsworth family by Newmains.
  /  /1841Wilsontown, Morningside and Coltness Railway
Act receives Royal assent. The Coltness Iron Works owners, the Houldsworths, were major shareholders.
  /10/1841Wishaw and Coltness Railway
Line completed to Chapel near the Coltness Iron Works. The iron works used the railway to transport its pig iron.
01/11/1858New Monkland Line (Monkland Railways)
Craigmill Branch opened from Standhill (Woodend Junction). Woodend mines owned by Coltness Iron Works.
  /  /1860Haywood Colliery
Sunk by the Coltness Iron Works.
  /  /1861Cleland to Morningside Line (Caledonian Railway)
An extension of the Cleland branch to Morningside [CR] is promoted. The branch will serve numerous mines and the Coltness Iron Works, avoiding the Morningside Incline of the existing route to Morningside [1st]. It also provides possible access to Edinburgh over the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway owned Wilsontown, Morningside and Coltness Railway. The Morningside [CR] extension of the Cleland branch predates its extension east through Shotts to Midcalder.
  /  /1870Woodend Colliery (Armadale)
Opened by Coltness Iron Works for coal and anthracite.
  /  /1880Blairhall Colliery
Sold by the Lochgelly Iron Company to the Coltness Iron Works.
  /05/1887Coltness Iron Works
Travel arranged for CIC workers between Newmains and Sunnyside. The company pays the Caledonian Railway an annual fee.
  /  /1890Blairhall Colliery
Begins to be worked out, the Coltness Iron Works plans to sink new shafts Lord Bruce and Lady Veronica named after Lord Elgin's children to reach new coal measures.
  /  /1893Douglas Colliery
Sunk by the Coltness Iron Works.
  /11/1913Raw Pit (East Calder)
Closed by Coltness Iron Works for limestone (Raw Camps Quarry and East Camps Quarry). The Camps Branch (North British Railway) was directly associated with the quarry and carrying limestone from Camps Lime Works to the iron works.
  /  /1919Kingshill Colliery No 1
Opened by the Coltness Iron Works. Connected to the Wilsontown, Morningside and Coltness Railway. The town of Allantown is developed by the company and local council for miners.
  /  /1923Dewshill Colliery
Owned by the Coltness Iron Works.
  /  /1928Kingshill Colliery No 2
Sunk by the Coltness Iron Works. Served by the Wilsontown Branch (Caledonian Railway). It was colloquially known as 'Queenshill'.
  /08/1946Kingshill Colliery No 3
Sunk by the National Coal Board, originally planned by the Coltness Iron Works.
  /  /1952Kingshill Colliery No 3
Opened by the National Coal Board. Connected by double track cable haulage railway to new preparation plant at Kingshill Colliery No 1. The new preparation plant also replaces the Royal George Washery at the Coltness Iron Works and is used for coal from Branchal Mine and Overtown Mine.
  /  /1956Straiton Lime Works
Locomotive transferred from the Coltness Iron Works.