Military Port Number 1 Railway

Introduction

Faslane Harbour was built during the Second World War as an additional docking facility to counter the possible destruction of Londons docks as well as docks of other cities. The port at Cairnryan was constructed at the same time to provide further capacity.

The line was built to connect Faslane to the West Highland Railway (owned by the London and North Eastern Railway at the time) at Faslane Junction. The branch ped from the West Highland Line as a double track before ending at a reversing spur at the west end of the Faslane Harbour. From here a series of sidings ran to the Faslane pierheads. The railway was built to European standards of track and signalling to give troops practise before the D-Day invasions. Due to the single track nature of the West Highland Railway the loop at Garelochhead was lengthed and a small marshalling yard installed at Dalmore (on the Glasgow, Dumbarton and Helensburgh Railway) to the east of Craigendoran Junction.






Portions of line and locations

This line is divided into a number of portions.


Faslane Port Line



This junction was installed in the Second World War. It was a double track junction as a long loop was put in on the West Highland Railway and the connection to the Faslane Branch yard was double track. Faslane Junction Yard was just to the north on the branch.
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Remains of signalpost at former marshalling yard by Faslane Junction. ...
Ewan Crawford //
This is a BR PR&PO photograph originally taken by the LNER in 1945 showing Faslane Junction signal box.

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PR&PO British Railways (Douglas Blades Collection) //1945
37175 with the Royal Scotsman at Faslane Junction in 1985. ...
John McIntyre //1985
Faslane Junction looking towards Garelochhead in 1984. The line to the military exchange sidings left the WHL below the V in the trees in the centre ...
John McIntyre //1984




Associated locations

This station is open. It was an island platform station with a typical West Highland Railway chalet style station building and, originally, a typical West Highland signal box.
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Platform sign at Helensburgh Upper on 2 June 2009. [The Gaelic version omits the 'Upper'.] ...
David Panton 02/06/2009
The 14.43 Helensburgh Upper to Queen Street Low Level pulls in exactly to time, having come in two halves from Oban and Mallaig. Only stops now - ...
Colin Miller 20/04/2016
A pair of 37s, led by 37410, head south on the 'ghost' at Helensburgh in 1994. ...
Ewan Crawford //1994
Passengers wait to catch the morning service from Glasgow to Oban service at Helensburgh Upper on a wet summers day in August 1985. ...
John McIntyre 14/08/1985


This wartime yard was opened to the east of Craigendoran Junction along with Craigendoran West Yard. Access was controlled by Craigendoran East signal box. The yard was laid out on the north east side of the line. It had two sets of sidings and a turntable, all approached from the west. The yards were used in combination with Ardmore Yard for Faslane Military Port.
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