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Stanhope and Tyne Railway

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Stanhope and Tyne Railway

This line is closed. It was famous for the trains running from Tyne Dock to and from the Consett iron and steel works. Short sections remain open at Washington and Tyne Dock. The works at Consett are now closed.

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Closed

Yes

Durham Junction RailwayDurham Junction Railway Tanfield Railway Clickable map of the Stanhope and Tyne Railway.
Washington, looking north.
Washington, looking north.

Chronology

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This line served the considerable Consett iron and steel works.

Way leaves Pontop & South Shields Act 1842 (Ran up to Consett)
(West portion Sold to Derwent Iron Coy, Consett - sells portion to Stockton and Darlington Railway in exchange for new connection to Crook (Wear and Derwent Jnct Rly, 1845)
Howns Gill viaduct between Consett & Rowley (now part of the Stockton and Darlington Railway) replaced inclines with viaduct in 1858 - by Thomas Bouch - butresses added after tay bridge disaster.

New line added from Blackhill via Lanchester valley to Durham September 1862
1867 Derwent valley to Scotswood  - doubled between Scotswood and Durham for much of length.

Washington

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Washington, looking north.
Washington, looking north.
Washington, looking south over the former junction between the lines to Darlington and Consett.
Washington, looking south over the former junction between the lines to Darlington and Consett.

The line remains open at Washington as part of the mothballed East Coast Main Line route from Ferryhill to Gateshead. From here to Consett the line is a cycleway. The station here had a very large signalbox.

Deviation End of deviation

Low Gill

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More or less the site of the former Low Fell yard, used by the Consett Iron and Steelworks.
More or less the site of the former Low Gill yard, used by the Consett Iron and Steelworks.

Low Gill was the marshalling yard for the Consett Iron and Steelworks. Both the site of the yard and of the works have been landscaped and it is difficult to find much remaining of either.


Page created on 14/03/2000
Page last edited on: 02/04/2012
Contact: Ewan Crawford