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Glasgow, Paisley and Greenock Railway

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Introduction
Local area
Chronology

Locations
Greenock Central
Cartsdyke
James Watt Dock
Ladyburn Shed 
Bogston 
Port Glasgow Junction
Port Glasgow 
Woodhall 
Langbank 
Bishopton 
Georgetown 

Walkinshaw West Junction 
Walkinshaw East Junction 
Paisley St. James 
Paisley Gilmour Street 

This site
Caledonian Railway
Paisley and Barrhead District Railway
Glasgow and Paisley Joint Railway
Glasgow, Paisley, Kilmarnock and Ayr Railway
Gourock Extension Railway (Caledonian Railway)
Greenock and Wemyss Bay Railway

Other sites
ScotRail


Glasgow, Paisley and Greenock Railway

This line is open and carries a regular electric train passenger service between Gourock, Greenock, Paisley and Glasgow as well as a branch line to Wemyss Bay.

Survey To be entered
Engineers To be entered
Act 1837
Contractors To be entered
Opened 31/3/1841
Closed No

Clickable map of the Glasgow, Paisley and Greenock Railway  


Greenock Waterfront  (Replica of Endeavour at Custom's House Quay)

 
Greenock Custom's House Quay

Local area 

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This line runs through the outskirts of Paisley, farmland, the explosives factory at Bishopton and westwards by the Firth of Clyde to Greenock, once a centre of shipbuilding and today only represented by a few such as the Ferguson's shipyard at Port Glasgow.

Chronology 

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This line was initially independent but was quickly bought by the Caledonian Railway who established their first locomotive workshops at Greenock before re-locating them to St Rollox.

Description of route 

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From Greenock to Paisley. A joint line with the Glasgow, Paisley, Kilmarnock and Ayr Railway continued to Glasgow. 

Greenock Central

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The station roof was removed about ten years ago. These photographs show the station as is was in 1987. (The station was also known as Cathcart Street before extension westwards by the Gourock Extension Railway (Caledonian Railway) to Gourock. The station was inconvenient for the Caledonian Railway's (and other operators) steamers to Firth of Clyde piers which ran from Greenock harbour. After opening of the Glasgow and South Western Railway's Greenock and Ayrshire Railway, to Princes Pier and Albert Harbour, the Caledonian Railway's position was very poor and the extension west to a specious new pier and station closer to other Clyde pier gave them an edge on such traffic.

Cartsdyke

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This is a two platform station.

James Watt Dock

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Gravity shunting at the James Watt Dock, Greenock.

This included the United Molasses Depot, formerly used in conjunction with Glenochil Yeast at Menstrie. The depot was reached via a reversing spur and was quite unique in being gravity shunted. The locomotive would back the train up the hill to Ladyburn, the enter the dock siding, then the train would be run down the hill passing the siding, the locomotive would then come out the siding at the other end of the train. The dock siding continued across a level crossing out onto the wharf-sides, but although connected, this was recently only ever used to store one or two crippled waggons.

Sadly the site is no longer served by rail and the embankment and bridge over the main road removed.

There was an end-on junction with the Greenock and Ayrshire Railway's Inchgreen branch here. 

Ladyburn Shed

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In the background on the right can be seen the loops used in connection with the James Watt Dock. Ladyburn Shed was located on the left side of the tracks shown in this view. In common with much of Greenock it suffered serious bomb damage in the Second World War.

Bogston

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This is a two platform station.

Port Glasgow Junction

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This is an east facing junction where the Greenock and Wemyss Bay Railway joins the line.

Port Glasgow

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There was a bay platform at the west end of the station for services to Wemyss Bay. The platform was located on the south side of the line and is now infilled.

Note the now demolished Goliath crane in the background; below a photograph of the crane when partially demolished. The crane was built by the Arrols company to a higher specification than had been realised by the demolition team ...  

Woodhall

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This is a two platform station.

Langbank

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This is a two platform station. The building in the photograph was demolished in the late 1990s.

Bishopton

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Since the left hand picture was taken the building was rennovated and the shelter at the left hand side of the building, built in wood, removed. Bishopton has a large explosives factory which is served by sidings at the northwest end of the station. The sidings (right picture) are on the south side of the line at the station's west end.

Slightly further west the line runs through a deep stone-cut cutting and then through a tunnel cut through whinstone.

Georgetown

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This was a two platform station, also known as Houston, which served a military establishment to the west which stretched from here to Bishopton. A short section of railway fencing remains at the west side.

To the south of the station a branch ran west from south of the station to serve coalmines.

Walkinshaw West Junction

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This was a west facing junction for the Paisley and Barrhead District Railway which ran south from here to the Linwood Car Plant and Barrhead.

Walkinshaw East Junction

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This was an east facing junction for the Paisley and Barrhead District Railway which ran south from here to the Linwood Car Plant and Barrhead.

Paisley St. James

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This is a two platform station. To the north side of the line was a large goods yard and short branch to another goods yard which was used by Spillers and Shanks. The goods yard by the station is now removed and used as a carpark.

Should the Glasgow Airport link be built it will start from a junction on the Glasgow side of the station.

Paisley Gilmour Street

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Here the line meets the Glasgow and Paisley Joint Railway and Glasgow, Paisley, Kilmarnock and Ayr Railway.


Page created on 11/03/1997
Page last edited on: 11/03/2012
Contact: Ewan Crawford