RAILSCOT Logo
A History of Britain’s Railways
Search: 

Glasgow, Bothwell, Hamilton and Coatbridge Railway

Home Home   Mail me Contact

This page
Introduction
Local area
Chronology

Locations

This site
Coatbridge Branch (North British Railway)
North British Railway

Other sites
ScotRail


Glasgow, Bothwell, Hamilton and Coatbridge Railway

This line is closed. The line was also known as the London and North Eastern Railway's Hamilton Branch.

Survey To be entered
Engineers To be entered
Act To be entered
Contractors To be entered
Opened 1 November 1877
Closed 6 June 1961
Clickable map of the Glasgow, Bothwell, Hamilton and Coatbridge Railway

Bothwell Castle
Bothwell Castle

Local area 

Top 

This line runs through the small town of Bothwell and to the large town of Hamilton. Both today are suburbs of Glasgow but Hamilton was formerly very industrial with coalmines serving the iron-making industry in the Monklands and Motherwell. The line pretty much ran from coalpits in Hamilton to the ironworks at Coatbridge and forge at Parkhead.

Chronology 

Top 

The line was built by iron and coal masters to connect serve their pits; coal would flow from the Bothwell and Hamilton areas north to the ironworks at Coatbridge and north west to Glasgow.

James Young was contractor for contracts 1 and 3. Brand and Son was contractor for contract 2. The signalboxes were built by Robert McAlpine, who went on to be a major contractor.

Description of route 

Top

From Shettleston to Hamilton with a branch from Bothwell to Coatbridge. The line was double track.

Shettleston Junction

Top

The line joined the Coatbridge Branch (North British Railway) here at a west facing junction. The main line runs west to east and the Hamilton branched off to the south east. A pair of stub sidings (formerly electrified) remain. There was a signalbox here in the 'v' of the junction closed for the Yoker resignalling scheme. It opened on the 31 July 1904 replacing an earlier signalbox.

Shettleston South Signalbox

Top

This was a signal box just to the south of Shettleston Junction. This probably served the Acme Steel Foundry which was located to the west of the line and just to the south of Shettleston Junction. The signalbox closed in 1938

Mount Vernon North

Opened 1883 as Mount Vernon, closed 1 January 1917, re-opened 2 June 1919, re-named Mount Vernon North September 1952, closed 2 July 1955.

This was a two platform station with timber platforms. A station building here was burnt when a porter tried to thaw a pipe which turned out to be a gas pipe rather than a water one. There was a signalbox here closed in 1927 on replacement with a groundframe. The line crossed the Rutherglen and Coatbridge Railway to the south of the station. There was a link to this line from a north facing junction, the link joining the line at an east facing junction just to the west of where the line was crossed. Just to the south of the link line junction (and before crossing the other line) was a branch to the Barrachie Colliery and Brickworks which ran from a west facing junction and then ran north.

Broomhouse

Top

Opened 1883, closed 1 January 1917, re-opened 2 June 1919, closed 24 September 1927.

The station here closed in 1927 but the signalbox remained open. The signalbox replaced an earlier on in 1914 and was closed in 1960. The station remained standing after closure. There was a brickworks siding. To the south of the station was the Broomhouse Colliery and to the north the Daldowie Colliery.

Calderpark Halt for The Zoo

Top

Opened 5 July 1951, closed 2 July 1955.

This halt was opened in 1951 to serve Calderpark Zoo by Mrs Cameron wife of British Railway's Chief Regional Officer for the area.

Calderbraes Viaduct

Top

This viaduct crossed the North Calder Water.

Maryville

Top

Opened after 1883, closed 1 February 1908.

This station closed in 1908. There was a signalbox here, closed in 1940, and to the north of the station there were Clydesdale Colliery sidings and the Bredisholm Branch which ran from a north facing junction to the Bredisholm Colliery pits near Drumpeller.

Uddingston West

Top

Opened 1883 (or 1888), closed 1 January 1917, re-opened 2 June 1919, closed 2 July 1955.

This station had two timber platforms and a signalbox. The station opened in 1888. There was a link to the Viewpark Colliery Pits No 1 and 2 a short branch from a north facing junction ran to this colliery by the Clydesdale Junction Railway. Between the station and Uddingston East the line crossed over the Clydesdale Junction Railway on a bridge above Uddingston Junction.

Uddingston East

Top

Opened 1 April 1878, Closed 1 Junary 1917, re-opened 2 June 1919, re-named Uddingston East 28 February 1953, closed 2 July 1955.

This station had two platforms and a stone built as well as the usual timber buildings. This was the first of the two Uddingston stations, on this line, to be opened. There was a signalbox here opened in 1900 and reduced to a ground frame in 1955.

Bothwell (West) Junction

Top

This was a south facing junction between the lines from Shettleston and Coatbridge. To the west were sidings for the Bothwell gas works. The signalbox was operated by a travelling signalman from 1955.

Rosehall South Signalbox

Top

This was the north end of the Coatbridge branch which joined a colliery branch of the North British Railway at Rosehall. The branch continued north to Whifflet and Coatbridge. The signalbox closed in 1945.

Bellshill

Top

Opened 1 May 1879, closed 1 January 1917, re-opened 2 June 1919, closed 10 September 1951.

The site of the station here has been re-developed. The station once had both Bellshill North (closed in 1945 on singling of line) and Bellshill South (closed 1931) signalboxes.

Bothwell Park

Top

This was a halt and signalbox. Nearby the line crossed over the Clydesdale Junction Railway south of Bothwell Junction. There were branches to Bothwell Park Colliery No 1 and 2 Pits (just to the north) and Hamilton Palace Colliery Pits No 1 and 2 on a branch from a west facing junction (to the south). Both branches were joint with the Caledonian Railway. The signalbox closed in 1945.

Bothwell

Top

Opened 1 April 1878, closed 1 January 1917, re-opened 2 June 1919, closed 2 July 1955.

This was a two platform station, with a junction immediately to the north. The station had a sandstone building and signalbox. The signalbox was operated by a travelling signalman from 1955. Part of one of the platforms remain (on the left in the photograph). The site has been landscaped. The view looks north.

Just to the west of the station was the Bothwell Castle Colliery Pits No 1 and 2. This colliery closed in 1949. The station became the terminus of the line in 1952 due to undermining of the Craighead viaduct just to the south of the station.

Craighead Viaduct

Top

This viaduct was to the south of Bothwell station. It was undermined and led to the line being closed between Hamilton and Bothwell (excluded), although the line was left intact and was used durinf its own dismantling to fill the tunnel under the Hamilton Branch north of Burnbank.

Craighead Signalbox

Top

This was a signalbox to the south of the Craighead viaduct and served the Craighead Pit Nos 1 and 2. To the south of here the line passed under the Hamilton Branch. The signalbox closed in 1943.

Blantyre Junction

Top

This was a north facing junction for the goods-only Blantyre Branch which ran west to Auchenraith and Blantyre. There was a signalbox here.

Auchinraith Branch Junction

Top

This was a west facing junction for the branch to Auchinraith Colliery Pits No 1 and 2. The branch ran first north and the west to the pits which were also served by the Hamilton and Strathaven Railway. The signalbox was closed in 1925 and the line worked as a siding.

Blantyre Pits Signalbox

Top

This was a signalbox were the line served the Priestfield Colliery No 1 Pit and Blantyre Colliery No 2 Pit which were also served by the Hamilton and Strathaven Railway. The signalbox closed in 1932 and line became a long siding.

Burnbank

Top

Opened 1 April 1878 as Greenfield, re-named Burnbank, closed 1 January 1917, re-opened 2 June 1919, closed 15 September 1952.

This station is closed and landscaped. There was a signalbox here opened in 1888 and closed in 1941. Just to the south was a short branch, from a north facing junction towards Earnock, which ran south to join the Earnock Branch of the Hamilton Branch.

Peacock Cross

Top

Opened 1 April 1878 as Hamilton Peacock Cross, re-named Peacock Cross February 1882, closed 1 January 1917.

This was a two platform station. The area has been landscaped, the view looks east along the former site. There was a high signalbox (closed 1948) to the east of the station called Allanshaw which served the Allanshaw foundry and, from a west facing junction, a branch to the Allanshaw Colliery No 1 and 2 pits, also served by the Hamilton Branch. Just to the east of the junction the line crossed the Hamilton Branch and its Allanshaw Colliery branch. After closure of the line to Bothwell the line here remained in use for a while, accessed via the Allanshaw Colliery branch.

Hamilton

Top

Opened 1 April 1878, closed 1 January 1917, re-opened 2 June 1919, closed September 1952.

This station was the terminus of the line. There was a signalbox here. The site has been re-developed.


Page created on 19/01/1998
Page last edited on: 11/03/2012
Contact: Ewan Crawford