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Forth and Clyde Junction Railway

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Introduction
Local area
Chronology

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Forth and Clyde Junction
Croftengea Siding
Jamestown
Caldarvan
Drymen
Gartness
Gartness Junction
Balfron
Buchlyvie
Buchlyvie Junction
Mey's Siding
Port of Menteith
Kippen
Gargunnock
Stirling North Junction

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Forth and Clyde Junction Railway

This railway ran between Stirling and Balloch and is closed.

Survey To be entered
Engineers To be entered
Act To be entered
Contractors To be entered
Opened 18 March 1856
Closed 5 October 1959

Clickable map of the Forth and Clyde Junction Railway
Clickable Schematic of route [Key]

Local area

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This line runs more or less east-west following the old Military road from Dumbarton to Stirling. The area is largely farmed and part of the area was formerly flooded and was drained to become Flanders Moss.

Chronology

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Forth and Clyde Junction

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From this north facing junction with the Caledonian and Dunbartonshire Junction Railway the line ran east to Stirling. The Act planned for a junction facing south, towards Dumbarton and Glasgow but the junction was built facing Balloch and Loch Lomond.

Croftengea Siding

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The site is now landscaped and built on.

Jamestown

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The site is now an industrial estate. The location of the station is a road.

Caldarvan

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This station was originally called Kilmaronock and had a signalbox or ground frame to control the level crossing to the east but no passing loop or siding. It is likely it gained at least a siding later. Land was taken sufficient for two tracks although only one was laid.

Although there was signaling for the crossing at Caldarvan there is no listing of a signalbox but this does not preclude there being one of some description at an early date. Later the signals must have been controlled from a ground frame in the station area or station house.

In 1956 the station was listed by British Railways as having the following facilities GP*LH

These are;
G- Goods traffic
P* - Parcels and Miscellaneous Traffic
L - Live stock
H - Horse boxes and Prize Cattle Vans

No crane is listed.

This implies there was a siding and loading bank which does not appear on the earlier maps.

A house still stands at the station site. Sections of platform can be discerned.

Drymen
 
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The goods shed remains standing at this site. The station was really in the town of Croftamie and quite far from Drymen. The station building remains although the trackbed and platforms were desroyed when the Loch Lomond Water Supply Scheme was built.

Drymen Viaduct
 
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This large viaduct is to the east of Drymen station. The original piers and decking are gone and the Loch Lomon Water Supply Scheme pipe runs along the piers. There is a public footway across the top.

Gartness

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The remains of this station's timber platform can be found under bags of silage which occupy this site. One of the level crossing gates remains.

Gartness Junction

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Today a sylvan setting. At this east facing junction the Strathendrick and Aberfoyle Railway joined the Forth and Clyde Junction Railway. The formation is still clearly visible.

Balfron

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Owned by the Forth and Clyde Junction Railway but used by the Strathendrick and Aberfoyle Railway trains - as a result of which it remained open for passengers after the Balloch-Stirling route had shut to passengers. Now a stable occupies the platform area. In the small town of Balfron Station. The station was not very convenient for Balfron and a village grew up around it with the name of Balfron Station.

Buchlyvie

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Owned by the Forth and Clyde Junction Railway but used by the Strathendrick and Aberfoyle Railway trains - as a result of which it remained open for passengers after the Balloch-Stirling route had shut to passengers.. There is a photograph of the Royal Train at this station. Now used as a dwelling house.

Buchlyvie Junction

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From this west facing junction the line to Aberfoyle turned north away from the Stirling route. The tracks of the Strathendrick and Aberfoyle Railway and the Forth and Clyde Junction Railway ran together to Buchlyvie station.

Mye's Siding

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Level crossing gates remain at this site.

Port of Montieth

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The station is now in use as a house. A waiting room sign remains.

Kippen

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This closed station is a excellent condition. It still boasts platforms (track bed infilled), the building, the goods shed and the signal box. The signal-box has some slight damage to its rail-side which was caused by overhanging materials on one of the last goods trains passing through.

Gargunnock

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The station is largely eradicated. Some portions of a timber platform remain by the road. A timber yard now exists where the goods yard was.

John McLaren, whose family owned the adjacent sawmill to the north of the station, sent me the following information and photographs of the station while the line was still open;

This view looks west along the line towards Balloch. The photograph is taken from the east end of the westbound platform. Behind the footbridge on the left is the signalbox which remained after line closure until road improvements. To the right of the nearest wagon of the train is the portion of platform which remains at the site today. To the left of the fence is the A811 Dumbarton Road and by the train is the B8075 Kirk Lane level crossing. The stationmaster's house (to the right of the station with three chimneys) remains standing today. The goods yard at this station was on the other side of the level crossing to the right of the main running lines.

This shows a large tree trunk being delivered to the station. The wagon is unusually long and seems to be a North Eastern Railway wagon. The size of this tree led to handling difficulties.

Here the tree is being taken out of the goods yard. To manage this on of the gate-posts had to be removed.

Stirling North Junction

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The line met the Scottish Central Railway here at a south facing junction. There was North British Railway (eventual owners of the Balloch-Stirling line) sheds on either side of the line. Here the Sentinel steam car used on the Aberfoyle (or was this in maintained in Glasgow?) and Balloch routes was maintained.


Page created on: 10/01/1999
Page last edited on: 11/03/2012
Contact: Ewan Crawford